The Latest: North Carolina LGBT law left largely intact


RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on a North Carolina law limiting protections for the LGBT community (all times local):

10:30 p.m.

The North Carolina General Assembly has largely left intact a law limiting protections for LGBT people.

The House and Senate approved a change late Friday night that restores workers’ ability to use state law to sue over workplace discrimination. However, the change doesn’t enhance workplace protections on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity.

Legislative leaders have said that’s the only change to the law planned this session.

There was no appetite among Republican lawmakers to undo a requirement that transgender people must use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates in many public buildings.

Nor did they alter provisions that exclude gender identity and sexual orientation from statewide antidiscrimination protections.

2:30 p.m.

A top North Carolina legislator says a state law limiting protections for LGBT people will stay largely intact.

House Speaker Tim Moore said Friday that lawmakers were likely to change the law only to allow people to sue in state court over workplace discrimination.

He told reporters that he expected no other changes. The yearly legislative session is slated to end this weekend.

Another provision of the law known as House Bill 2 has fueled a nationwide controversy. It requires transgender people to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificate in many public buildings. The law also excludes gender identity and sexual orientation from statewide antidiscrimination protections.

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12:05 p.m.

Time is running short for North Carolina legislators to change a law limiting protections for the LGBT community.

Even if changes are made before the weekend, when the legislative session is expected to end, there’s no appetite to undo a provision requiring transgender people to use restrooms corresponding to the sex on their birth certificates in many public buildings.

Pressure to change the law has come from several quarters including the NBA, which has been considering whether to keep its 2017 All-Star Game in Charlotte. The league issued a joint statement late Thursday with the Charlotte Hornets, saying they doubt that any proposed changes would go far enough.

The Human Rights Campaign issued a statement Friday saying that a full repeal of the law is the only acceptable solution.

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