Latest: Injured officers meet with Obama during Dallas visit


DALLAS (AP) — The Latest on the recent police-involved shootings around the United States (all times local):

10 p.m.

Two community college police officers injured in a deadly shooting during a protest in downtown Dallas say that when they met with President Barack Obama, he expressed his appreciation for their efforts during the sniper attack.

Detective Cpl. Bryan Shaw of the El Centro College police force told The Associated Press Tuesday that Obama was “thankful for everything that we did.”

A bullet grazed Shaw’s abdomen, but he continued facing down the gunman. Shaw’s colleague, Officer John Abbott, also continued working even after shards of glass went into both of his legs.

Obama spoke Tuesday in Dallas at a memorial service for the five police officers slain in Thursday’s attack. Shaw and Abbott both attended the service and later were among those who met with the president.

Abbott said the service was “very well done.” He said, “It was good to see people coming together as much as they were.”

___

3:55 p.m.

A 22-year-old Maryland man has been charged after several officers were fired at during a robbery and carjacking.

A police news release Tuesday afternoon said 22-year-old Luvell Alverson of Suitland, Maryland, has been charged with armed robbery, kidnapping and assault on a police officer.

Police Chief Cathy Lanier said the gunman carjacked an SUV with people inside after robbing four others at gunpoint. Then, she said, the man fired on officers from inside the vehicle, and officers returned fire. Lanier said it was a miracle no officers were killed.

Police said Alverson was arrested after being shot in the leg and trying to run away.

___

3:50 p.m.

A state representative from Baton Rouge says black community leaders want Louisiana’s attorney general to appoint a special prosecutor to handle any state investigation into Alton Sterling’s shooting death.

Rep. Ted James says the attorney general’s office doesn’t have the level of expertise to do the investigation. He says the appointment of an outside prosecutor would depoliticize the work.

The U.S. Department of Justice has opened a civil rights investigation into the death of Sterling, a black man killed by white police officers. East Baton Rouge Parish District Attorney Hillar Moore has recused himself, leaving Attorney General Jeff Landry to handle any state criminal investigation.

James and black businessman Cleve Dunn spoke Tuesday to local Republican leaders.

Dunn says African-American leaders also are calling on police to release the 911 call and surveillance video from the convenience store where Sterling was killed.

___

3:40 p.m.

A suburban St. Louis police officer who was shot last week during a traffic stop will require long-term care.

The Ballwin Police department said in a Facebook posting Tuesday that Officer Mike Flamion and his family “will forever be changed by his injuries.” Further details on his injuries were not released.

Flamion has been hospitalized since Friday, when he was shot from behind as he walked back to his car after stopping a suspect for speeding. Authorities have not discussed a possible motive.

Antonio Taylor, of St. Louis, is charged with assault of a police officer, armed criminal action and possessing a firearm as a felon.

The police department said Flamion’s family appreciates the outpouring of support.

___

3:10 p.m.

The memorial service in Dallas for five slain police officers concluded with the elected officials and guests on stage holding hands as “Battle Hymn of the Republic” was sung. Audience members also held hands during the song.

Former President George W. Bush, holding hands with first lady Michelle Obama, smiled and swayed as the song played. The first lady sat next to the former president during the ceremony and patted his left hand warmly to show appreciation for his comments.

Before walking off stage, President Barack Obama, Michelle Obama, Bush and Laura Bush turned and applauded the audience of uniformed police officers.

The pictures of the five officers killed dominated the stage after the speakers had left.

___

2:40 p.m.

Black and white religious and community leaders from a broad spectrum of churches and groups have met in Baton Rouge, Louisiana, to share emotions, tragic stories and map out a strategy for making the city more equitable and racially united.

The gathering was convened by Together Baton Rouge, a group of churches and organizations pushing to turn the fatal shooting of Alton Sterling into a moment of change and action for the city.

The group also announced an effort to create teams to help organize protests, look into the investigation and foster police reform.

The Rev. Lee Wesley said that the group’s goal was not to “go back to business as usual” but affect change. He said Baton Rouge has a “faulty foundation” that needs to be fixed by making the city more unified across racial lines.

The gathering shouted out in response: “Change the foundation! Change the foundation!”

___

2:30 p.m.

President Barack Obama is asking Americans to find the character to open “our hearts to each other.”

Obama spoke Tuesday at a memorial service for five officers killed in Dallas on Thursday. He is asking whether Americans can see in themselves a common humanity and recognize how different experiences have shaped people’s perceptions.

Obama says, at times, he has doubts, saying “I’ve been to too many of these things.”

He says that’s why Americans should pray for each other to have not a heart of stone but one that’s open to the fears and challenges of their fellow citizens.

Obama also says he believes the police officers who died in Dallas did not die in vain, and he says there is evil in the world, which is why “we need police departments.”

___

2:15 p.m.

President Barack Obama says Americans can’t dismiss protesters who call attention to racial issues 50 years after the Civil Rights Act as troublemakers.

The Democrat said Tuesday at a memorial service for the five officers who were fatally shot last week that Americans know that bigotry remains, some are affected by it more than others and that none of us “are entirely innocent.”

He also said that the country asks police “to do too much” and that we do “too little ourselves.”

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

2:10 p.m.

President Barack Obama says the shootings of five Dallas police officers would appear to have exposed the “the deepest fault line of our democracy” but that Americans must reject such despair.

Obama spoke Tuesday at the memorial service for the five, honoring the work of law enforcement officers, saying they answer a call that at any moment, even in the briefest of interactions, may put their life in harm’s way.

He said fewer people are being mourned at the service because of the brave actions of the officers killed.

Obama attended the memorial along with first lady Michelle Obama, Vice President Joe Biden and his wife, Jill Biden.

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

1:50 p.m.

The funeral for a black Minnesota man fatally shot by a police officer will be held Thursday at the Cathedral of St. Paul.

Church officials say the mother of 32-year-old Philando Castile requested the cathedral hold an ecumenical service for her son.

The Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis said Valerie Castile wanted the funeral to be an opportunity for “people to come together in a new way.” The cathedral rector will lead prayers and a Baptist pastor will deliver a eulogy.

Philando Castile was shot Wednesday during a traffic stop in the St. Paul suburb of Falcon Heights by an officer from the neighboring St. Anthony police force. Castile’s girlfriend, a passenger in the car, streamed the shooting’s aftermath live on Facebook.

Castile’s funeral begins at noon after a processional from the funeral home and a viewing.

___

1:45 p.m.

The Dallas police chief has recited lyrics from Stevie Wonder’s song “As” to the families of the five officers who were fatally shot last week.

Chief David Brown said Tuesday at a memorial service for the five officers who were fatally shot in Dallas last week that he often would find himself at a loss for words as a young man trying to get dates, and would use lyrics to express himself.

That’s what he did at the service for the families of those who died.

Brown said, among other lyrics: “Just as hate knows love’s the cure, you can rest your mind assure that I’ll be loving you always.”

Brown received a long, loud standing ovation from those in attendance.

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

1:35 p.m.

Former President George W. Bush says that Americans should “remember their shared commitments for common ideals” as a means of bridging divisions.

Bush said Tuesday at a memorial service for the five officers who were fatally shot in Dallas last week that Americans know we have one country and don’t want the unity of grief and fear, but hope.

Bush also said of the five officers: “With their deaths, we have lost so much.”

President Barack Obama is also slated to speak at the service.

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

1:30 p.m.

U.S. Sen. John Cornyn says that in times of darkness, it’s important to remember that the officers who died and were injured in Dallas last week were “not overcome by evil.”

The Texas Republican said Tuesday at a memorial service for the five officers who were fatally shot in Dallas last week that the officers overcame evil by running toward gunfire, shielding citizens and sacrificing their own lives.

Cornyn also praised Dallas Police Chief David Brown for his simple statement this week that “Dallas loves.”

President Barack Obama and former President George W. Bush also are slated to speak at the service.

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

1:20 p.m.

A law enforcement official says the gunman who killed five police officers during a Dallas protest had a pistol, a handgun and a rifle on him at the time of the attack.

The official says Micah Johnson had a Glock 19 Gen4 pistol, a Fraser .25-caliber handgun and a semi-automatic Izhmash Saiga assault-style rifle on him when he was killed by a robot-delivered bomb after the Thursday night shootings and that the guns were purchased legally.

The official spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity in order to discuss an ongoing investigation.

Dallas Mayor Mike Rawlings has said the 25-year-old Johnson was wearing a bulletproof vest during the attack. The three specific weapons were first reported by CNN.

___

Associated Press writer Nomaan Merchant contributed to this report.

___

1:10 p.m.

Dallas mayor Mike Rawlings says the dignitaries are at the memorial service because we have a “common disease,” which is violence on the streets.

Rawlings said Tuesday at a memorial service that the five seats that are empty are for the five officers who died last week in Dallas, saying “we love you, we will never forget you.”

Rawlings also said that the service should be about unity.

The five who died were shot during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

President Barack Obama, Texas Republican Sen. John Cornyn and former President George W. Bush are slated to speak at the service.

___

1:05 p.m.

President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden have arrived at the memorial service for the five officers who were shot and killed last week in Dallas.

Obama, Michelle Obama, Biden, Jill Biden and several members of Congress, including Texas Republican Sens. Ted Cruz and John Cornyn, flew to Dallas on Tuesday. The Obamas, Bidens and former President George W. Bush and his wife, Laura, are seated on stage.

Obama, Cornyn and Bush are all slated to speak at the service, where five seats have been kept empty to honor the five who died during a protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota. Nine officers and two civilians were injured in the attack.

___

12:40 p.m.

President Barack Obama has placed telephone calls to the family members of Alton Sterling and Philando Castile, two black men killed in separate police shootings last week that sparked protests around the country.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says Obama made the calls aboard Air Force One as he flew to Dallas on Tuesday to participate in a memorial for the five police officers killed during a protest on Thursday.

Earnest said the president offered condolences on his behalf and first lady Michelle Obama’s, as well the American people.

Valerie Castile’s brother, Tracy Castile, said his sister had been invited to Tuesday’s memorial service for the five police officers slain during a protest over the death of Castile and Alton Sterling, who was killed by police last week in Louisiana. But Tracy Castile said his sister chose to stay in Minnesota to focus on her son.

Valerie Castile said she was ecstatic to get the president’s call.

___

11:40 a.m.

Indianapolis’ police chief says a suspect is in custody after someone opened fire on an officer’s patrol car overnight outside the officer’s home.

Chief Troy Riggs says the officer’s cruiser was struck three to four times about 2:30 a.m. Tuesday. Riggs says the officer and his family were home but weren’t injured.

He says he’s troubled by the shooting, which comes in the wake of the fatal shootings of five Dallas police officers Thursday night.

He says a suspect is in custody and “it certainly seems that he was upset with police.” Sgt. Kendale Adams says that suspect has not been charged.

Riggs says the city’s 1,600 officers put their lives on the line every day “and last night someone tried to take away potentially an officer and his family’s lives.”

___

11:10 a.m.

An attempt by Minnesota police to reopen the street that’s been occupied by demonstrators in front of the governor’s mansion was short-lived.

Police early Tuesday cleared Summit Avenue of tents, chairs and other property as they opened the street to traffic.

But just a couple hours after it was reopened, police closed it again as demonstrators who are protesting the police shooting of Philando Castile took over the avenue again.

The street has been occupied since Castile, a black man, was shot Wednesday by a suburban St. Paul police officer, the aftermath of which was live streamed on Facebook by his girlfriend, who was also in the car along with her 4-year-old daughter.

In November, protesters camped outside of a Minneapolis police precinct for several days after Jamar Clark, who was also black, was shot by police and died a day later.

___

11 a.m.

Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas is among the lawmakers accompanying President Barack Obama aboard Air Force One as he travels to Dallas to speak at an interfaith memorial service for five police officers killed on Thursday.

White House spokesman Josh Earnest says Tuesday that Cruz’s presence, as well as speeches from former President George W. Bush and GOP Sen. John Cornyn of Texas, are examples of how the country is not nearly as divided as it might seem given political debates, campaign rhetoric and congressional dysfunction.

Earnest says that “it’s in moments of tragedy, that this unity is revealed.”

Other members of Congress flying with the president include Minority Leader Rep. Nancy Pelosi of California and Texas Democratic Reps. Marc Veasey and Eddie Bernice Johnson.

___

10:30 a.m.

The attorney for the family of a Minnesota black man who was shot and killed by police during a traffic stop says there will be a lawsuit against the officer who fired the shots.

Attorney Glenda Hatchett wouldn’t discuss details Tuesday of the planned litigation in the death of 32-year-old Philando Castile, who was shot by St. Anthony police officer Jeronimo Yanez on Wednesday in the St. Paul suburb of Falcon Heights.

State officials are still investigating the shooting. The decision on possible criminal charges will fall to a local county attorney.

Castile’s family hired Hatchett, best known as a television court-show judge. She says she won’t rely on the state’s investigation to proceed with a lawsuit against Yanez.

___

11:05 a.m.

Five people have been arrested in Washington, D.C., after at least one opened fire on police.

But a police spokesman says there’s no indication that the early Tuesday incident was a “planned attack on police.” No injuries were reported.

It follows recent protests over police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota and the fatal shooting of five police officers in Dallas.

Police say a system that detects gunshots brought officers to southeast Washington. When officers arrived in marked police cruisers, people inside an SUV began shooting at them. Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck says police returned fire and the car’s occupants refused to come out. Three women and two men ultimately surrendered.

Sternbeck tells WTOP (http://bit.ly/29KuIKw ) “we do not have information that this was a planned attack on police.”

___

9:40 a.m.

A black Detroit police supervisor has been reassigned and placed on restricted duty after posting controversial Facebook comments.

Police Chief James Craig didn’t disclose details, but described the remarks as “misguided” and the result of “bad judgment.”

The supervisor’s name wasn’t released. Craig announced the action Monday night, hours after talking to reporters about Facebook comments posted by a white detective, who called the Black Lives Matter movement “racists” and “terrorists.”

Nate Weekley has been demoted while Detroit police conduct an internal investigation. Unlike Weekley, Craig says the supervisor, a sergeant, can’t be demoted under civil service rules.

Craig says he’ll take “prompt action” if social media posts contradict the mission of the department, no matter the person’s race.

___

8:05 a.m.

A police union official says four off-duty Minneapolis officers working a WNBA game walked off the job at the city’s Target Center arena Saturday after Minnesota Lynx players wore pregame warm-up jerseys supporting the Black Lives Matter movement.

The shirts listed the names of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, both fatally shot by police officers last week. Castile was killed by a police officer in suburban St. Paul during a traffic stop. The shirt also showed the Dallas police shield above the phrase “Black Lives Matter.”

Minneapolis Police Federation President Bob Kroll tells the Minneapolis Star-Tribune (http://strib.mn/29zD4qo ) he commends the officers. He says they took their names off a list of officers to work future games.

The newspaper says Minneapolis police, the Lynx and the Target Center haven’t commented.

___

7:30 a.m.

Police in Washington, D.C. have arrested five people they say opened fire on police.

No injuries were reported early Tuesday.

The latest incident follows protests over police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota and the fatal shooting of five police officers in Dallas last week.

Police spokesman Dustin Sternbeck said by telephone that officers responded to gunshots in southeast Washington. When officers arrived in marked police cruisers, people inside an SUV began shooting at them. Sternbeck says police returned fire at the suspects, who barricaded themselves in the vehicle.

Police ordered the people to come out, but they refused. After about 30 minutes, three women and two men in the SUV surrendered.

Sternbeck says it’s not clear why they fired on officers. The investigation will include whether they were involved in any other crimes before police arrived.

___

4:30 a.m.

President Barack Obama will find himself in an all-too-familiar place when he leads a tribute to more lives ended by a man with a gun.

Obama will try Tuesday to help Dallas begin to heal after five of its police officers were slain in the line of duty. They were targeted by an Army veteran-turned-sniper during what Obama denounced as a “vicious, calculated and despicable attack” by a “demented” individual.

Obama is preparing to address a memorial service for the officers. They were killed while guarding a peaceful protest against the police killings of black men in Louisiana and Minnesota last week. Obama’s spokesman says the president hopes to offer Dallas “some measure of comfort.”

Former President George W. Bush, a Dallas resident, is also scheduled to speak.

comments powered by Disqus