Jordan, Faber support Trump for president


By Sheryl Roadcap - [email protected]



Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst, left to right, and Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst watch U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan speak during a Breakfast Briefing with our Elected Officials Wednesday, Oct. 12. The event was held by the Sidney - Shelby County Chamber of Commerce at The Oaks Club. Speakers at the breakfast included State Senator Keith Faber, Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst and Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst.


Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

SIDNEY — Two elected officials — U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan and State Senate President Keith Faber — voiced their continued support for presidential Republican candidate Donald Trump during a breakfast briefing Wednesday morning at the Shelby Oaks Golf Club.

Jordan, R- Urbana, 4th District, Faber, R-Celina, 12th District, along with Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst and Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst addressed local business owners and community leaders on pertinent issues to Shelby County. The breakfast was sponsored by the Sidney-Shelby County Chamber of Commerce.

Jordan said Trump was not his choice but he is his nominee, and if Republicans would rally around him, Trump still has a “real chance to win.”

Faber said the common question he is asked about support of Trump. He said Trump won the Republican nomination “fair and square.”

“Donald Trump has said some disgusting things, but Hillary Clinton has also said some disgusting things and done some disgusting things. And she will leave this a more dangerous country for our kids and grandkids. So when confronted with saying disgusting things versus somebody who has done disgusting things (who) will leave our country more dangerous, I don’t think it is tough choice,” Faber said. “Donald Trump wasn’t my candidate. I did 14 states for my candidate, but Donald Trump is my nominee.”

Jordan began the breakfast briefing by thanking attendees for allowing him to serve, creating jobs and for all they do to make Shelby County such a “great place.”

Two issues of concern for Jordan are “at the heart of what our great country is really about.” These issues deal with incentivizing work and the double standard within the country for the “politically connected.”

“America needs to get back to incentivizing work … If you are an abled-body adult with no dependents … You’re not going to get taxpayer help in the form of food stamps unless you do some kind of work; unless there is some kind of work component … The American work ethic is one of the things that makes us the greatest nation ever. There are lots of things why we are the best, but that is central to it. And when you lose that component…,” Jordan said as he contrasted the U.S. work ethic to the European “mindset” by breaking into a story of a time when he visited his granddaughters in Italy and was unable to find an open restaurant for dinner at 5 p.m.

Jordan pointed out that the Congressional Budget Office said Obamacare disincentivized work because it unmotivated people to get better jobs for fear of losing their healthcare “subsidy.”

Jordan said there is a double standard for the “regular folk” and a different standard if you are “a part of the politically connected class,” such as Clinton, among others, who he feels are handled unjustly.

“You cannot have unequal treatment under the law,” said Jordan of his thoughts surrounding Hillary Clinton’s email investigation. “That cannot continue to happen, or you undermine the rule of law; you undermine this central component of what our country is about.”

An attendee asked Jordan why Ohio Gov. John Kasich did not attend the Republican National Convention and about Kasich’s decision to not support Donald Trump. Jordan said he did not know why the governor and other Republicans are reluctant to support the nominee and they would need to ask Kasich why he did not attend.

Faber spoke about the Ohio Senate budget review which he said will save Ohio employers over $500 million next year. In 2017, small business’s federal unemployment tax surcharge will go down because the state paid off the unemployment debt to the federal government. Faber boasted that as of 2016, the Ohio income tax rate on small business income was reduced to 0 percent on the first $350,000 of income.

“It goes on with our ongoing effort to restructure and change how businesses are treated in the state of Ohio,” Faber said.

Another change which Faber recently worked to pass was a bill that requires state agencies to be looked at every four years by the legislature to ensure they are functioning appropriately and become reauthorized. He said if the agency doesn’t act, it will end. He pointed out that 17 other states in the U.S. have similar legislation.

The Education Deregulation Bill is another piece of legislation he is working on for the schools to be able to regulate themselves. He said he believes the superintendents and principals at schools doing a good job should be allowed to make the decisions best for their schools.

Faber spoke about a new bill that focuses on the infant mortality issue which needs addressed in Ohio. He said it encourages new techniques and strategies to help save the numerous Ohio lives lost before their first birthday.

Faber also briefly touched on the heroin epidemic and asked attendees to thank Shelby County Sheriff John Lenhart for his work on the problem.

“If you see Sheriff John Lenhart, do me a favor and tell Sheriff Lenhart thank you, because he is working on this heroin epidemic like few others are … I can tell you the most important thing you can do to impact heroin in your own communities. The most important thing you can do is help people to never get started. And let me tell you the best way to do that … have the conversation with your kids and grandkids and the kids on your sports teams and the kids in your neighborhood. And talk to them about never starting drugs,” Faber said.

Finally, Faber spoke about what he believes is the difference between the conservative and the liberal models of compassion and how it relates to the upcoming election.

“Compassion to me is not about creating dependence. It’s about creating independence. And that’s why I say all the time, if you look at this presidential race … if you have a system and a person who is all about creating more people on dependence and you have another person that talks about methods to get people free of dependence and set them on the path to independence, the latter is going create a country that will give our kids and our grandkids the same God-given opportunities to meet their God-given potential that our parents and grandparents gave us,” said Faber.

Friday’s paper will include the issues discussed by local leaders, Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst and Mayor Mike Barhorst.

Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst, left to right, and Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst watch U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan speak during a Breakfast Briefing with our Elected Officials Wednesday, Oct. 12. The event was held by the Sidney – Shelby County Chamber of Commerce at The Oaks Club. Speakers at the breakfast included State Senator Keith Faber, Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst and Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst.
http://sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/web1_SDN101316BreakfastElect.jpgSidney Mayor Mike Barhorst, left to right, and Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst watch U.S. Rep. Jim Jordan speak during a Breakfast Briefing with our Elected Officials Wednesday, Oct. 12. The event was held by the Sidney – Shelby County Chamber of Commerce at The Oaks Club. Speakers at the breakfast included State Senator Keith Faber, Shelby County Commissioner Tony Bornhorst and Sidney Mayor Mike Barhorst. Luke Gronneberg | Sidney Daily News

By Sheryl Roadcap

[email protected]

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.

Reach the writer at 937-538-4823.

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