Pity the poor rich


By Tom and Dee and Cousin Key



Dear Grandparenting: EverybodyÕs always talking about money, or should I say talking about how we donÕt have enough of it. I have five grandchildren. I hope I can afford to make a difference in their life, or open a door, in one way or another.

America once put people on pedestals that were great leaders or scientists or artists or writers. Now above all else we worship the almighty dollar and the ÒIÕm really, really richÓ crowd, to quote Donald Trump. ItÕs easy to think that the fat cats on Rich Street have it made, and that their grandchildren will have it made. But IÕm here to tell you thatÕs just not so.

Several of my social friends qualify as wealthy. Both started from scratch, did well, sold their company and retired. They were generous with family. Now let me tell you what they talk about. Nobody works anymore. The grandchildren either donÕt know or donÕt really care where the money came from. They donÕt do much but seem to have complicated lives and sure donÕt seem happy. Two of the grandchildren who will never have to work a day in their life already have drug

Dear Grandparenting: Everybody’s always talking about money, or should I say talking about how we don’t have enough of it. I have five grandchildren. I hope I can afford to make a difference in their life, or open a door, in one way or another.

America once put people on pedestals that were great leaders or scientists or artists or writers. Now above all else we worship the almighty dollar and the “I’m really, really rich” crowd, to quote Donald Trump. It’s easy to think that the fat cats on Rich Street have it made, and that their grandchildren will have it made. But I’m here to tell you that’s just not so.

Several of my social friends qualify as wealthy. Both started from scratch, did well, sold their company and retired. They were generous with family. Now let me tell you what they talk about. Nobody works anymore. The grandchildren either don’t know or don’t really care where the money came from. They don’t do much but seem to have complicated lives and sure don’t seem happy. Two of the grandchildren who will never have to work a day in their life already have drug problems. What is it about big money that makes people like that? Gene Franklin, Dayton, Ohio

Dear Gene: When F. Scott Fitzgerald announced that rich people “are different than you and me,” Ernest Hemingway replied, “Yes, they have more money.” Not smarter or happier — just more money, and certainly not without their share of problems.

It’s a fallacy that wealth buys happiness. According to a recent Princeton University study, an annual household income of $75,000 makes people about as happy as they’re ever going to get. Above that, one’s mood doesn’t seem to improve. Those earning $500,000 or $5 million are no happier at all.

Grandchildren born into wealth can inherit a special set of problems — the nagging fear that friends are using them, guilt they don’t deserve such good fortune, the struggle to escape the long shadow of forebears who made good and a lack of motivation that trust funds can engender, perhaps putting them on the road to a dissolute life as a substance abuser.

Wealthy families that set out to enjoy all the goodies that big money can buy may emotionally neglect their children, resulting in resentment and episodes of acting out. And in this age of austerity, it’s less acceptable to flaunt it. But if grandchildren opt to conceal their good fortune, they must submerge their identity. It’s hard to pity the poor rich, but their travails sure make that $75,000 sound better and better.

GRAND REMARK OF THE WEEK

“Big Mike” Mitchell from Kingsport, Tennessee, was surprised to learn that that his 60-year old sister, Patsy, was considering “getting some work done” on her face.

“Who needs plastic surgery,” he said, “when you have grandchildren to keep you young?”

http://sidneydailynews.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/10/Tom-and-Dee-byline-1.pdf

By Tom and Dee and Cousin Key

Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285. Call 410-963-4426.

Dee and Tom, married more than 50 years, have eight grandchildren. Together with Key, they welcome questions, suggestions and Grand Remarks of the Week. Send to P.O. Box 27454, Towson, MD, 21285. Call 410-963-4426.

comments powered by Disqus