The Latest: Charlotte chief: No reason to impose curfew

CHARLOTTE, N.C. (AP) — The Latest on protests in Charlotte, North Carolina over the fatal police shooting of a black man. (all times local):

11:45 a.m.

Charlotte’s police chief says he sees no reason to impose a curfew in North Carolina’s largest city, even after two nights of violent protests following the shooting of a man by a police officer.

Chief Kerr Putney said the city now has more resources to deal with problems, following a declaration of a state of emergency and the arrival of the North Carolina National Guard and more officers from the State Highway Patrol.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts said earlier Thursday the city was considering a curfew. She defended the decision not to seek an emergency declaration earlier, noting the city had been calm during the day Wednesday. She says the request was made at the appropriate time when more resources were needed.

Roberts again called for calm as the shooting investigation continues.


10:55 a.m.

Charlotte’s police chief says he plans to show video of an officer shooting a black man to the slain man’s family, but the video won’t be immediately released to the public.

Police Chief Kerr Putney said during a news conference Thursday that the video does not definitively show 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott pointing a gun at anyone.

Putney says he is working to honor the request from the family of Scott to view the video. It’s unclear when or if the video might be released publicly.

The video could be key to resolving the chasm between police, who say Scott refused repeated commands to drop his gun, and residents who say he was unarmed. It’s not clear what the body cameras worn by three officers who were present during the shooting may have captured.


10:15 a.m.

Life is returning to normal on downtown streets in Charlotte despite two nights of violence.

On Thursday morning, a few uniformed police officers are walking around the area. The governor declared a state of emergency Wednesday night and called on help from the National Guard, but no Guard members were present on the street Thursday morning.

Glass and uprooted plants can be seen on the sidewalk from the protests Wednesday night.

Traffic is flowing in the area although at least three major companies asked their employees to stay home on Thursday.


9:55 a.m.

The mayor of Charlotte says officials have no time frame for when they might release camera footage of the fatal police shooting of a black man.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts told “NPR” Thursday morning that releasing the police video “depends on the investigation and its progress, and it depends on the discretion of the chief to some extent.”

Calls for police to release the video have increased along with the violent protests, but the police chief has resisted. North Carolina has a law that takes effect Oct. 1 requiring a judge to approve releasing police video, and he said he doesn’t release video when a criminal investigation is ongoing.

Roberts said she hopes to watch the video Thursday or Friday. “I certainly would feel better being able to see it,” she said, adding that she doesn’t know how conclusive the video footage is until she watches it.

Police said the plainsclothes officer who shot 43-year-old Keith Lamont Scott, identified as Brently Vinson, has been placed on leave, standard procedure in such cases. Three uniformed officers at the shooting scene had body cameras; Vinson did not, police said.


9:45 a.m.

Federal help is on the way to Charlotte after two nights of violence after the fatal police shooting of a black man.

The Justice Department is sending a team of trained peacekeepers designed to help resolve community conflict.

The department’s Community Relations Service has been deployed to other cities roiled by tense flare-ups between police and residents.


8:50 a.m.

The mayor of Charlotte says the city is considering a curfew after two nights of violence in the wake of the shooting of a black man by police.

Mayor Jennifer Roberts told ABC’s “Good Morning America” on Thursday that city officials are talking about imposing a curfew.

Streets were calm Thursday morning, but several civilians and police officers were hurt in the second night of violence Wednesday night.

City spokeswoman Ashley Simmons told local media that Roberts’ office will discuss a possible curfew with city police and the National Guard on Thursday.

The mayor said she wants people to know Charlotte is open for business Thursday. But at least three major companies told workers to avoid downtown offices.

The North Carolina National Guard arrived at a Charlotte armory early Thursday and some Guard vehicles left the armory about 8 a.m.


7:55 a.m.

The NASCAR Hall of Fame in downtown Charlotte is among the places damaged during violent protests over the police shooting of a black man earlier this week.

The Charlotte Regional Visitors Authority oversees the NASCAR Hall of Fame building and the convention center next door. An official said the building is being assessed for damage.

According to local news outlets, a street sign hung off-kilter from the front window of the hall’s building after someone tried to pry it out of the window.

The regional United Way building across the street from the hall was also damaged. Lobby windows were smashed. Officials don’t know if anyone entered the building.

Charlotte-Mecklenburg Schools are operating on a normal schedule, as is Mecklenburg County government. The regional bus line says it has restored service to all lines.


7:30 a.m.

Major companies with offices in downtown Charlotte are telling their employees to stay home after two nights of violent protests following the shooting of a black man by police earlier this week.

Bank of America, Wells Fargo and Duke Energy all told employees to stay away from the area Thursday, where disturbances have damaged several business fronts.

A Duke Energy spokesman says non-essential personnel who work downtown are being told to stay home for the day.

Wells Fargo spokesman Josh Dunn said the bank’s staff is not required to report to work Thursday. Dunn said employees can work from home or another location if they’re able. Employees unable to do so won’t be required to take a personal day off.

Bank of America announced late Wednesday that its downtown staff will not report Thursday because of the damage.

The streets in downtown Charlotte appeared to be calm Thursday morning.


2 a.m.

Downtown Charlotte is calming down early Thursday after a peaceful prayer vigil turned into a violent protest over the fatal police shooting of a black man.

Hotel and restaurant employees and security guards have started cleaning up dozens of broken windows.

But the city isn’t entirely back to normal. Bank of America told its thousands of employees at its 60-story downtown skyscraper to stay home Thursday.

One man was critically injured in Wednesday’s protest. City officials say police did not fire on the victim. Several reporters and people on the street were attacked as police in riot gear linked arms, marched down streets and fired tear gas.

Four police officers were injured during the protests.

North Carolina Gov. Pat McCrory declared a state of emergency and promised to bring in the National Guard.

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